Qatar World cup

Preparation for Qatar World Cup Said to be “The Best Ever”

The difference in the start and end of seasons is that summer sports are played through June to August, while winter sports – such as those that will be played at the World Cup – kick-off in November and run until March. This allows for the stabilization of temperatures outside, meaning the football pitches won’t have to be cooled with expensive air conditioners.

It’s not only the stadiums that are being prepared for this novel event. Qatar has also been tasked with hosting a Super Bowl-like festival and fan zone in Doha, scheduled to be held on the 2022 Qatar World Cup final day.

Qatar, which is expecting to welcome 1.5 million tourists during the World Cup, plans to make the most out of the opportunity.

“We wanted to host a Super Bowl party in 2022,” Hassan Al-Thawadi, the 2022 Qatar World Cup’s chief executive officer said in an interview with CNN Sport.

Al-Thawadi says that this year will be when they “celebrate” and “demonstrate what we have been doing so far.” He stated that the preparations for Qatar’s World Cup are “the best ever”.

The FIFA World Cup 2022 is scheduled to take place in Qatar between 21 November and 18 December 2022.


Money talks

The country is building eight stadiums in seven cities: Lusail City, Al Khor City, Al Wakrah City, AlRayyan City, Umm Slal, and Al Bayt. The majority of the stadiums are expected to be completed by 2020, while Khalifa International Stadium and Sports City Stadium were finished in April 2016.

Qatar’s ministry of business and trade has also contracted to build many other stadiums, but progress appears to have been slow.

The committee is also pumping money into their successful marketing campaign – spending $50m on ads during the last two FIFA World Cups, including over $15m in Brazil. This figure however dwarfs their outlay on advertising during the London 2012 Olympics, when they spent a reported $16m.

When the World Cup comes to Qatar in 2022, it will be the first time that all stadiums would have been built from scratch, and this is better illustrated by the amount of money being poured into construction. Qatar is committed to spending an estimated $100bn on hosting the event – an increase from the initial $50bn.

Qatar World Cup Venue
Preparation for Qatar World Cup Said to be “The Best Ever”

It is believed that the total costs of hosting the event will amount to $200bn, including transport links and stadiums, according to the US Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS).

“I suspect it’s an awful lot more than $200bn when you consider all the other infrastructure they need. They won’t even have a spare seat in the country by 2022,” Simon Chadwick, professor of Sports Enterprise at Salford University in Britain told CNN.

“It’s a bit of a white elephant,” he added.

Qatar World Cup2022 also says that they have been mindful about their spending and have promised “efficient use of resources”, pointing out that the country has a population of just over 2 million.

There will also be no public funding involved, as Qatar 2022 is wholly funded by the private sector and ticket sales – with almost 1.4 million tickets already allocated for the Qatar World Cup.

“I don’t think it’s possible to spend $200bn on infrastructure in seven years,” Hassan Al-Thawadi, the 2022 World Cup’s chief executive officer told CNN.

“We want to make sure that we spread it over a period of seven years and that every two years we have one milestone completed,” he added.

Hassan al Thawadi declined to give an exact figure on how much will be spent on infrastructure alone, but said that the committee was “committed to building sustainable, efficient and cost-effective stadiums”.

“We have always been mindful of our spending. We have always been mindful as a committee as well as as a priority that we want to deliver an event that is not only going to be massive in 2022 but also one where we make efficient use of resources,” he said.

Al Thawadi added that “more than half” of the infrastructure required will be temporary, meaning it can be removed after the World Cup and hold other events in the future.

Hassan al-Thawadi says that despite all obstacles, Qatar is fully prepared to host a successful World Cup in 2022.

“We are absolutely confident that we will deliver,” he concluded.


Beyond barriers

“I think we will see a strong World Cup and I don’t think players will be dropping in any way,” the former Wigan Athletic and Everton manager said.

With qualifying stages explained, here is an excerpt from another article:

Qatar has made an excellent start in its preparations for hosting the 2022 World Cup, Gianni Infantino has said.

The Fifa president was speaking at the opening of Goal Bureau, an exhibition celebrating past World Cup moments.

Infantino praised Qatar’s progress since it won hosting rights in December 2010, despite concerns over worker deaths and bribery allegations.

“Qatar is now well on its way to being ready for 2022,” he said. “I am sure that what will be achieved by Qatar will be the best World Cup ever.”

A “summit” is coming up on June 1st to discuss new preparations.

Former US Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, Brazilian international footballer Ronaldo and leading architect Lord Norman Foster are among those attending the summit in Doha.

They will be joined by representatives from Fifa, Uefa, and the world players’ union FifPro.

The Football Association (FA) said it was “looking forward to attending this summit”, adding that it would discuss ways of making football more connected in Qatar ahead of 2022.

Other topics to be covered include youth development, refereeing standards, technology, and women’s football.

The summit will also include a mini-World Cup involving young children, which has been dubbed by the organizers as “the first-ever Fifa-sanctioned World Football Festival”.


Other topics

Qatar is currently facing fresh claims of worker abuses after Britain’s Guardian newspaper said it had found “evidence of forced labor on a huge World Cup infrastructure project”.

The tournament’s organizers and the Qatari authorities have repeatedly denied allegations that construction workers from Nepal, India, and elsewhere in the region who are building stadiums and developing other infrastructure for 2022 are exploited.

Qatar’s Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy, the government body responsible for World Cup preparations, said in a statement it was “committed to delivering a World Cup that respects workers’ rights and we have been working with international experts to achieve this”.

It added: “This partnership will provide independent assessment and in-depth research into the conditions of workers on our projects, the development of worker welfare standards, and the empowerment of workers to ensure that all labour rights are fully respected.”

The Qatar 2022 organising committee said it was “committed to ensuring the health, safety, well-being, and dignity of every worker”, adding that it had put an independent body in place for this purpose .

Qatar is spending more than $200bn (£140bn) on infrastructure projects and stadiums for 2022, including a new metro system and two stadiums.

An international labour organisation has previously accused Qatar of “state-sponsored slavery” over its treatment of many migrant workers, most from the Indian subcontinent.

Qatar said such claims were “baseless” and that it was implementing labour reforms.

Qatar beat Australia, Japan, South Korea and the United States in 2010 to win Fifa’s vote for the 2022 World Cup hosting rights.

Qatar said such claims were “baseless” and that it was implementing labour reforms.

Qatar beat Australia, Japan, South Korea and the United States in 2010 to win Fifa’s vote for the 2022 World Cup hosting rights.

The country is proposing eight stadiums in seven different cities – Lusail City, Al Khor City, Al Wakrah City, AlRayyan City, Umm Slal and Al Bayt.

These will seat between 40,000 and 50,000 people each. Two of them – Khalifa International Stadium and Sports City Stadium – were built for the Asian Games in 2006.

The remaining six stadiums are planned to be finished by 2020. Qatar’s ministry of business and trade has also contracted to build many other stadiums, but progress appears to have been slow.

The Fifa 2022 World Cup will be held between 21 November and 18 December if it is not moved to the winter months owing to Qatar’s hot climate.

This might result in a clash with the Winter Olympics which are scheduled for either February or March of 2022, and which could also affect Qatar’s preparations.

Qatar is spending huge sums on new infrastructure to host the World Cup, including a new metro system and stadiums.

The organisers will not say how much they spent on development so far.

An independent auditor is now carrying out an assessment of the organisers’ accounts to ensure they are transparent, said a World Cup organising committee spokesperson.

The event has been beset by controversy over corruption allegations involving former Fifa officials, as well as concerns about Qatar’s treatment of migrant workers.”